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Intel's New Smart Cuff Demands Its Own Digits

Photo via <a href="http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/wearables/fashion-technology.html?cid=sem132p31533g-c&amp;gclid=CjwKEAiA4rujBRDD7IG_wOPytXkSJACTMkgajwUukCJRptPqYTY5O5hTueGQgyz376-vHFzYon7UIRoCkAnw_wcB">Intel</a>
Photo via Intel

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Intel officially launched its MICA this past week, and the first reviews are a mixed bag. Engadget finds the style component to trump the wearable's technical substance. That's a win for Opening Ceremony —the brand that advised on the fashion design— but not so much for Intel. The Verge thinks the relatively affordable price tag of $495 (much lower than the original estimate of $1,000) could generate sales in the niche, high fashion market.

Reviewers are in agreement that MICA's separate connectivity with AT&T's 3G network and individual contact number are clunkier than the bangle itself. The separate number forces friends to decide which number to use to text you. That said, Intel's foray into fashion tech offers holiday shock value. The cuff comes in two 18-karat gold-coated styles, complete with snakeskin, pearls, lapis stones and a two-year contract with the cellular service provider. Find the smart bracelet, if you dare, exclusively in Barney's New York and Opening Ceremony stores in early December.
· When Beauty Meets Intelligence [Intel]
· Will You Spend $1,000 on a Smart Bracelet? [Racked SF]